2015 Holiday Open Studio Tour


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2015 Holiday Open Studio Tour will have 5 Locations


We are so excited this year to have added two potters to our Holiday Open Studio Tour for a total of 5 different locations where you can shop and visit with the artists. Barbarah Robertson and Chickadee’s Artist Gallery and Pottery Shop have agreed to be a part of this annual event and are helping to round out a county wide tour.

bea20ee7f37bc764fccaf24ea114cf56At the northern end of Shenandoah County, Liz Ashe-Hollingsworth with be showing and selling her lovely Earth Spirit Masks. “Magical one of a kind clay sculptures depicting nature spirits, faeries and animals enhanced with found natural objects.” You truly have to see these items in person to see just how awesome they are and the work that goes into these to make them so wonderful and magical.

Then in Strasburg, Barbarah Robertson, a juried artisan with the Artisan Center of Virginia, will be set up in Pot Town OrgaBeeMug1abnics, an O Shenandoah Artisan Trail Site. Barbarah will be showing and selling her functional kitchen and tableware meant for day to day use, as well as a line of whimsical garden & gift items. You can also get a look at the new shop Pot Town Organics, an organic nursery and gar
dening store.  Selling organic gardening supplies, lights, hydropoics, tools and more!  A fun place to visit if you enjoy gardening and food preparation. What a great combo to find handmade and organic items.

rabbit with Thistle-1Laughing Orange Studio is in the middle of the county, in Tom’s Brook where I have a few new items and the usual rabbit items and fairy garden items. I have been working on some cupcake cups, some cookie jars and the trays and mugs that I usually have on hand. A new outhouse design for the fairy garden or a wheel barrow or even a fairy ring might be just the thing for the fairy gardener in your life or on your list.
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Then, as you travel south to Woodstock, you can stop in at Kary Haun Studio where Kary will have her gorgeous porcelain work. Kary’s specialty items are ceramic drip coffee pots, drip tea mugs,
wine cups and more. Her glazes and nature inspired designs add to the elegance of the porcelain and it makes having a cup of coffee or a snack an experience rather than an everyday occurrence. 

11403211_969582256426829_1482607633049800930_nOur southern most site will be the new pottery in New Market called Chickadee’s Artist Gallery and Pottery Shop. Chris and George Jetter are the owners of this lovely Local Artist Gallery and Pottery Shop. The shop offers a wide variety of locally crafted items such as Pottery, Quilts, Blown Glass, Glass beads, Soy Candles, Digital and Film Photography, and much more! All pottery sold from Chickadees is created on site! You can even get a behind the scenes look at the craft of pottery by attending a live demonstration from George himself!

Postcards are going in the mail this week but be sure and mark your calendar if you are only on this newsletter list so that you come to this special event and take home some items for the holiday season to use during your own celebrations or to shop for that special person that is so hard to buy for.

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Be sure to follow the Holiday Open Studio Tour on Facebook because each of the five artists will be posting the progress of the work that we are preparing for this event and you will enjoy watching from there.

 

 

 

Shenandoah Alliance for Shelter’s Empty Bowl Supper

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This annual event will be held on Friday November 20th from 5:30-7:30 at the Central High School Cafeteria, in Woodstock, VA. This will be the fourth year that I have donated bowls. I love doing this because I know that it is for a great cause. Food is something that many of us take for granted and I know that there are plenty of folks out there that aren’t getting enough to eat. The Alliance for Shelter helps many of those who are in need in many ways.

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For the first time this year, you can purchase your tickets on-line by visiting their website at www.allianceforshelter.org and clicking on Empty Bowl Soup Supper.
Tickets can also be purchased at Woodstock Cafe in Woodstock, Sager Real Estate in Strasburg, Edinburg Mill in Edinburg, and Community Store in Basye, or reserve your tickets by calling Shenandoah Alliance for Shelter at 540-459-3212 or 540-459-8395. Tickets are limited to 300, so reserve your tickets early.
Tickets went on sale October 1, 2015.

I have pledged 30 bowls this year. Each bowl will have my signature frogs on them full of their personality, and a little of mine, hopefully!IMG_20151016_153625458

Also this year, I have had help with making my bowls and I would like to give a shout out to Kara Bowman and Ali Carithers and Patricia Wolfe for their help with adding glazes to the bowls, trying their hands at making a few of the frogs and to learning how much goes into making the bowls for the dinner. I love making these and these ladies all understand the importance of doing something for the community. I’d like to thank them for their help and also for the fun we shared doing the bowls.


 

Tang, the Laughing Orange Studio mascot…

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Tang continues to make me smile as I work in my studio daily. She can be grumpy somedays, curious most days and sleepy when she gets warm. When you come to the studio to see me or my work, stop in and see how soft she is and how much fun it is to have a rabbit as a pet and inspiration.


LOS at Va Clay FestivalThank you to all that have helped in my
new endeavors, the last 20 or so months of grief and have given encouragement to me, I have a wonderful set of friends and followers and I am grateful to you all,

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Don’t Forget to follow Laughing Orange on Facebook
and the Holiday Studio Tour  to see the fun as it is being created.

 

Fairy Garden Redo III…

now and then

now and then

The Fairy Garden that I built 4 years ago now is starting to show some age. I don’t take it in in the winter, like I should so the freeze this past winter has broadened the cracks that are in it. So, with Blandy Farm Mother’s Day Garden Fair coming up, I need to investigate what to do with it.

Each year I have replanted it. The first year it got small evergreens. The second year boxwoods. Last year, I used lavender and wood violets as you can see in the photo below.

The cracks had gotten so big recently that I decided to use a silicon calk to try and glue and seal them together. The clothesline rope is to hold it together and I am not sure if that will come off or not. I will have to see how the silicon holds and how the weight of the soil going back in helps to keep it together.

This image has been viewed thousands of times on the web. It is one of the gardens that shows up if you do a google search for fairy gardens in broken planters and many people have posted it, without my permission, as an example of how to build a fairy garden in broken planters. I have reached a point that when I come across one of these links on Pinterst or on Facebook, I just thank them for the free advertising and put a link to my Etsy shop. Currently, I don’t have enough of the items to put the kit as a listing but I will have enough soon.

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This was the second year with part of the evergreens and a boxwood off to the side.

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Then last year, I added some small lavender and a much larger house.

So, now I am at this stage of rebuilding.

What will the fairy garden look like in a few weeks? You will just have to wait and see. I wish I could get my hands on miniature lettuces and onions. I may have to make a batch of ceramic vegetables and put in a mini garden for the summer.

My Apprentice, Kara Bowman

 

Kara

Kara, working on her dad’s Father’s Day gift.

 

For the past several months, I have had a wonderful helper to help with all my fairy garden items. Kara Bowman is 14 and will be a freshman at Strasburg High School this fall. Kara loves history and is an avid Disney fan. She also is a crafter of wonderful duct tape items, wallets, flower pens and tri-fold wallets. She lives with her family in Maurertown, VA and lives on the Shenandoah River. Kara LOVES everything JMU (James Madison University) and hopes to attend school there in 2019 studying as a  physician’s assistant. She just finished a medical camp at Shenandoah Memorial Hospital learning CPR, dissecting a human eyeball, and touring the operating room. You can read more about this camp here. Kara loves getting paid with Dairy Queen blizzards but has been a real asset to helping my fairy garden inventory grow.

In the photo above, Kara is decorating a bowl that we made for her dad for Father’s Day. He is a big Baltimore Orioles fan.


 

I put the above text in my newsletter about Kara but, I want to add a full posting about her in my blog. Kara is a very kind and caring individual and during the past 6 months that I have been dealing with the grief of my son John’s death, she has been a wonderful companion to have and to sit with me in the studio. Kara’s mom, Cathy knew that this would be good for me, and also for Kara, to work with me, as an assistant, of sorts.

Kara is good about doing what I ask of her and is a quick learner and has a good eye for detail. She has really enjoyed doing the butterfly chairs and has looked up wonderful butterflies on her phone to replicate the colors and really enjoyed doing birdbaths. This was her first assignment and was very attentive to the different birds that she could add to the birdbaths. After the birdbaths were done, you could definitely pick out the orioles from the cardinals because she wanted them to look like the real birds.

I have introduced Kara to some new forms of music and movies and she has introduced me to everything Disney…. sometimes a bit too much Disney… but we try to share and enjoy each others tastes.

I would like to personally thank Kara, for being independent enough to be trusted and to know that it is okay to ask for something to eat or drink. I am not sure that she will come away from this experience wanting to pursue a career in ceramics but I hope this has added some depth to her education and the understanding of crafting as a business.

Kara has agreed to help me out with the Empty Bowls this year. I plan on teaching her how to make the frogs so that we can pledge a larger amount of bowls this year. The Alliance for Shelter in Shenandoah County lost a vital piece of their real estate to fire earlier in the Spring and hopefully our bowls that we contribute will help the homeless to have better shelter in the future. Kara has a caring heart and that is an organization that she holds dear so together we will do our part to help others.

Fairy Garden Redo

dead plant in back

 

Being extremely busy with trying to get ready to the Ol Time Edinburg Festival and being away for a week in Seattle, I didn’t give my fairy garden the water that it needed and so one of the larger plants died. I also think there may have been an air pocket in that back corner of the planter where the plant wasn’t getting the water that it needed when I did water it.

SO, I wanted to get it ready to take to the Festival in Edinburg this past weekend and I didn’t really have the funds to go and purchase a new plant so I thought I would share how I went about redoing the planter, at least from the planting perspective so that you can see my approach to a new look and a refresh of items in the planter.

removed all plant materials

I took out all the ceramic decorative items first and put them aside. Then I took out all the plant material.

So now, with a fresh canvas to work on and I can decide the new direction for the planter using plant materials that I still have and add some from my yard. My first thought is to take the boxwood and make it the feature plant and center it in the planter with the smaller plants on either side. At this point I haven’t scouted out the yard for something to add.

Scouting out plant material is something that I do often for many projects and you can certainly do the same. For this project, I was looking for something that would look forest like, would fill some of the space and would scale to the planter. I came across my sedum,

Boxwood centered

Autumn Joy, and thought that would give me some forest like stems but would also add some color for the festival. I have several planters of this in the yard in addition to having them in some of the flower beds so I had plenty to spare.

I divided the sedum and took some and put in the planter. At this point, the boxwood needed to move to the right of center and the sedum goes on the left. The smaller cypress that I still had could then become a small tree in the yard area between the houses.

 

 

sedum "Autumn Joy"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sedum and Cypress in place

 

 

Then I put all the elements in place and stepped back to take a look. I didn’t like it. It looked too much like the old version. I wanted it to have a different flavor, the sedum just wasn’t working for me and it was a bit too floppy in the back. So I took it all out and started again.

 

 

 

 

artemisia as trees

 

Hens, chick, pumpkins and curly que vines

 

Instead of trying to add a new plant, I decided to showcase some miniature pumpkins that I had made for Fall and thought it would be fun to add a small pumpkin patch between the houses.  This also meant that I needed to move the smaller cypress toward the back to allow for the garden space. I also found that I had some artemisia in a concrete planter in the front of the house that I could use as filler behind the small house to cover that back wall, give it a better scale than the sedum and add a new feel to the small house. 

 

finished redo of the Fairy Garden for Fall

This now works for me and I could add a few of the ghosts that I made to compliment the fall Halloween theme. I moved some of the hens and chicks both from this planter and from some in the backyard to plant with the pumpkins and they look like mini cabbages or heads of lettuces. I tried to plant them in rows, much like a garden would look. The mini pumpkins have small curly pieces of clay to mimic the vines that they grow on so that added the look and the hens and chicks filled in the space. I like this!

Now to just put everything else in to finish it up.

If you look closely, you can see that I put a fairy garden sign in the seam that is in the lower front of the planter. The blue butterfly chair is just a leftover that will go away, and I took some stepping stones to add to the seams on the left to add some interest where my hens and chicks haven’t filled in yet.

So, enjoy the redo of my fairy garden and don’t forget to water yours or you will be doing yours over too. I think it is fun to remake it for the different times of the year, but I don’t really want to kill the plants to do that. Changing the elements is certainly easier than a replant to get a new look, but you may still need to trim the plants or take them out if they get too big. The key to them getting too big though is to add water, which I seem to forget to do. Maybe I need to hire a new fairy to take care of that for me.

 

Vintage Woodstock Festival

 

 

 

Just a quick post this morning to let everyone know that I am doing an event this Friday night in Woodstock, VA called Vintage Woodstock. I have never been to this event, but it is local, and I am trying to be as local with my new work as possible. If you are looking for something to do this Friday evening, head to Woodstock, and stop in and see my new fairy garden items and new mug designs.

I’d love to see you there!

 

 

 

Do you believe in fairies?

LOS Booth at Blandy Farm

 

On Mother’s Day I did my first official venue as a potter. For those of you who are not familiar with this event, it is held at the State Arboretum, Blandy Farm, in Boyce, VA and is a wonderful way to welcome Spring if you are a gardener. There are all kinds of native plants and annuals and perennials. In addition to planting material there are garden objects (birdhouses made out of beer cans, sculptures, windchimes and chairs), handmade soaps and lotions, and garden tools. I was too busy to get out of my booth to take some shots of the vendors that were there but some of the companies that I could see within my site, I think, gave a good representation of what was there. Companies like, Peony’s Envy, The Bumblebee Studio, Horizons Ltd., EZ Hang Chairs and lots of garden nurseries. I could also see the llamas from Sunset Acres where I was located. In all, there were over 100 vendors.

The biggest draw for my booth was the broken planter fairy garden. It was located at the corner of my tent and we used it to anchor that corner due to it’s heaviness and allow it to stabilize the tent from wind gusts. We were amazed at the way this garden was like a magnet that drew people into the tent. They would ask to take photos of it, they would bring people back to look at it, they would smile and compliment it. At that time, I would invite them into the tent so that they could get all the accessories to go home and make one of their own. Almost instant sale!

Fairy Garden in a Broken Planter

Fairy Garden in a Broken Planter

I had no idea how popular this trend had become until I was picked up by the blog, Backyard Herbal Patch Herbal Blog, who gave me as a source for fairy garden accessories and showed this photo of the planter. I got a Facebook message from a lady from The Succulent Perch telling me that the photo had gone viral and had been shared over 1700 times. This was before the garden fair at Blandy, so I used this in my sales pitch. When folks wanted to take a photo, I would tell them about the number of shares on the web and that they could find the image if they didn’t get a good photo.

Fairy Gardens are trending and I am riding the wave for now. I was told by one lady that they have always been popular in New England. I found this article that says,

Houses are made so that fairies will have a place to be, to visit or even live if they wish.   With fairies in mind, they are created by children and adults alike in hopes that their creation will be enjoyed by the elusive and mysterious beings.   Whether part of a village or a sole dwelling, they are often nestled amongst trees and gardens.

One day, I hope to catch sight of a fairy out of the corner of my eye while I am visiting one of the villages or enjoying a festival.   Perhaps you will, too.

In the meantime, I am enjoying making the items for fairy gardens and am sprinkling lots of fairy dust around in hopes that I can make the fairies more comfortable while putting a smile on the faces of folks that visit my booth. I certainly believe now…